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TEST MY METRICS

PERSONALIZED

IQ ANALYSIS

mepr_name
mepr_date

IQ TEST RESULTS

mepr_name
mepr_date
mepr_iqscore IQ SCORE
mepr_percentile% PERCENTILE
The margin of error on this test is +/-2. So the possible range of your IQ Score is 2 more or 2 less than mepr_iqscore.

TYPES OF IQ

Intelligence is measured in many ways, but IQ generally captures a person’s knowledge, skills, problem solving, and ability to learn. Scientists have divided IQ into two kinds of intelligence: Crystallized Intelligence and Fluid Intelligence.

CRYSTALLIZED
INTELLIGENCE

We often categorize a person’s knowledge and skills as crystallized intelligence. Crystallized intelligence is a measure of one’s lifetime learning and academic skills, and is often represented by a person’s vocabulary and general knowledge.
Crystallized Intelligence Graphic

FLUID
INTELLIGENCE

Fluid Intelligence Graphic
Problem solving and ability to learn are often categorized as fluid intelligence. Fluid intelligence is defined as the ability to think and reason abstractly and solve new problems. Fluid intelligence does not depend on past learning, experience, or education.

TYPES OF FLUID
INTELLIGENCE

Fluid intelligence is the ability to examine a problem, identify patterns, find relationships between things, and use logic to solve problems. Fluid intelligence applies to a number of areas of life, including solving new problems, thinking critically about important topics, making decisions in the face of uncertainty, and more.
The following skills are components of Fluid intelligence:
Pattern Recognition
PATTERN RECOGNITION
Abstract Reasoning
ABSTRACT REASONING
Working Memory
WORKING MEMORY
Problem Solving
PROBLEM SOLVING
Inductive Reasoning
INDUCTIVE REASONING
Spatial Orientation
SPATIAL ORIENTATION
Processing Speed
PROCESSING SPEED
Decision Making
DECISION MAKING
Critical Thinking
CRITICAL THINKING
Planning
PLANNING

YOUR PERSONALIZED IQ ANALYSIS

In this report you will be provided with detailed analysis, feedback, and recommendations in 3 components of Fluid intelligence:

Inductive Reasoning
INDUCTIVE REASONING
Ability to make sense of something based on small observations or examples.
WORKING MEMORY
Ability to hold information in your mind and then mentally manipulate this information.
Working Memory
Pattern Recognition
PATTERN RECOGNITION
Ability to solve problems that are abstract. Abstract problems are not physical and nonverbal.
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YOUR PERSONALIZED
IQ ANALYSIS

Inductive Reasoning

INDUCTIVE
REASONING

mepr_name
mepr_date
Strong
Good

STRONG

GOOD

HAD CHALLENGES IN

INDUCTIVE REASONING SKILLS

ANALYSIS

OF YOUR INDUCTIVE REASONING ABILITIES

Your score on inductive reasoning indicates that you have a strong ability to move from the specific to the general in order to answer new questions or solve novel problems.
Your score on inductive reasoning indicates that you have a good ability to move from the specific to the general in order to answer new questions or solve novel problems.
Your score on inductive reasoning indicates that you may have had some challenges solving problems on the test today. You may have struggled with any or all of these skills.
Transfer Learning
TRANSFER LEARNING
Your capacity to transfer learning from one situation to another is stronger than most. You are more capable than others of noticing similarities between two things, and use your experience with one to better understand the other.
TRANSFER LEARNING
You have a good capacity to transfer learning from one situation to another. You are capable of noticing similarities between two things, and use your experience with one to better understand the other.
TRANSFER LEARNING
The capacity to transfer learning from one situation to another. Being capable of noticing similarities between two things, and using experience with one to better understand the other.
USING PROBABILITIES
You have a strong ability to use probabilities in your daily life. You are able to mentally track how often things occur, or the ratio of things occurring, based on your observations.
USING PROBABILITIES
You are able to use probabilities in your daily life. You can mentally track how often things occur, and the ratio of things occurring, based on your observations.
USING PROBABILITIES
The use of probabilities in your daily life. Mentally tracking how often things occur, or the ratio of things occurring, based on observations.
Using Probabilities
Using the Known
USING THE KNOWN
You have a strong ability to use what is known to you in order to make predictions about the unknown. You are confident in using the information you’ve noticed to apply it to a future event.
USING THE KNOWN
You are capable of using what is known to you in order to make predictions about the unknown. You apply this information confidently to a future event.
USING THE KNOWN
The ability to use what is known to you in order to make predictions about the unknown. Applying this information with confidence to a future event.
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INDUCTIVE REASONING OVERVIEW

Inductive Reasoning refers to your ability to make sense of something based on small observations or examples. Rather than having a theory about a problem or situation, inductive reasoning is the ability to come to a conclusion based on limited information.
For example, inductive reasoning allows you to take a few pieces of information about a person (he enjoys drawing, painting, and sculpting) to come to a new conclusion (he will enjoy photography, too).
These conclusions may not always be correct, but the ability to use inductive reasoning to solve problems and answer questions is often a useful mental shortcut for everyday life. Mental shortcuts help us move through our days with efficiency, make decisions quickly, and solve problems.

INDUCTIVE REASONING SKILLS

Inductive reasoning is made up of a number skills that come together to help you solve problems.
Transfer Learning
TRANSFERRING LEARNING
Transferring learning from one situation or problem to another. For example, your interactions with one teacher at your child’s school allows you to prepare for interactions with other teachers.
USING PROBABILITIES
Using probabilities, or the likelihood of something occurring or being true. In fantasy football, for instance, we use probability to understand our team’s chances of making it to the playoffs.
Using Probabilities
Using the Known
USING THE KNOWN
Using the known to predict the unknown. For example, using a student’s GPA to predict whether or not they will be a good employee is an example of applying inductive reasoning.

APPLYING INDUCTIVE REASONING SKILLS

Inductive reasoning applies to many areas of real life, including making educated guesses about new situations and daily experiences based on the best available information. Inductive reasoning can apply to any area of life where you want to take specific observations and apply them more broadly.
Work
WORK
At work you might observe that emailing several colleagues seems to get a faster response than leaving voice messages and conclude that emailing is the best way to communicate with everyone.
HOME
After eating a certain food for the first time, for example, you develop a rash. As a result, you conclude that you are allergic to the new food.
Home
Science
SCIENCE
Scientists use inductive reasoning to build theories based on observations. For example, observations of one chimpanzee using tools changed our understanding of chimpanzees as a species.

IMPROVING INDUCTIVE REASONING SKILLS

OBSERVATION
SKILLS

Improve your observation skills. Since inductive reasoning is based on your ability to observe, you can improve this skill by becoming a better observer. There are a few ways to become a better observer:
be more curious about what you see; notice what you are experiencing internally (e.g., emotions or thoughts) as these can get in the way of your ability to observe; and tune in to your senses more fully – what you see, hear, smell, touch, and taste.
Observation Icon

GAMES

Games
Practice with games such as crossword puzzles and Sudoku. Any puzzle that allows you to make guesses and fill in blanks is good practice for your inductive reasoning skills.

EXPOSURE TO
NEW

Expose yourself to new problems or learnings. Take a class on something new that interests you. Read about new subject areas. This will help activate learning and new connections in your mind.
Exposure to New

CONCENTRATION

As with other skills, improving your attention and concentration can work wonders for your inductive reasoning skills as well. Meditation and avoiding multitasking are two of the best ways to accomplish this.

PRACTICE TESTS

If you are being tested on your inductive reasoning for employment purposes, taking practice tests can help improve your scores.
Practice Test
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YOUR PERSONALIZED
IQ ANALYSIS

Working Memory

WORKING
MEMORY

mepr_name
mepr_date
Strong
Good

STRONG

GOOD

HAD CHALLENGES IN

WORKING MEMORY
SKILLS

ANALYSIS

OF YOUR WORKING
MEMORY SKILLS

Your score on working memory indicates that you have strong working memory skills.
Your score on working memory indicates that you have a good ability to attend to and mentally manipulate information and don’t exhibit any particular challenges in controlling your attention.
Your score on working memory indicates that you may have had some challenges attending to and manipulating information. You may have struggled with any or all of the following skills.
ATTENTION
Your ability to pay attention is stronger than most and you are able to notice and attend to key information.
ATTENTION
Your ability to pay attention is good and you are able to notice and attend to key information.
ATTENTION
The ability to pay attention, or notice and attend to key information.
MENTAL REPRESENTATION You are also very capable of holding onto outside information in your mind after it has passed. For example, remembering the phone number someone just told you.
MENTAL REPRESENTATION
You are capable of holding onto outside information in your mind after it has passed. For example, remembering the phone number someone just told you.
MENTAL REPRESENTATION
The ability to hold onto outside information in your mind after it has passed. For example, remembering the phone number someone just told you.
Mental Representation
Mental Processing
MENTAL PROCESSING
You have a strong capacity to process information in your mind to manipulate it and transform it as needed. For example, solving a long division problem in your head, without a pen or calculator.
MENTAL PROCESSING
You have the capacity to process information in your mind to manipulate it and transform it as needed. For example, solving a long division problem in your head, without a pen or calculator.
MENTAL PROCESSING
The capacity to process information in your mind to manipulate it and transform it as needed. For example, solving a long division problem in your head, without a pen or calculator.
BLOCKING DISTRACTION
Your ability to block out distractions is stronger than most, which allows you to bring your full attention to the task at hand.
BLOCKING DISTRACTION
Your ability to block out distractions is good and it allows you to bring your full attention to the task at hand.
BLOCKING DISTRACTION
The ability to block out distractions around you and therefore bring your full attention to the task at hand.
Block Distractions
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WORKING MEMORY OVERVIEW

Working memory involves your ability to attend to information, hold information in your mind and then mentally manipulate this information, or control and handle this information in a new way.
Working Memory Analysis

WORKING MEMORY SKILLS

Working memory is made up of skills that come together to help you hold and mentally transform information:

CONTROLLED
ATTENTION

Bringing your full attention to the task at hand or the information in front of you.

MENTAL
REPRESENTATION

Mental Representation
Representing this new information in your mind for a short period of time. For example, holding onto the sounds you hear or the sights you see in your mind after hearing or seeing them, after they have passed.

MENTAL
PROCESSING

If you are being tested on your inductive reasoning for employment purposes, taking practice tests can help improve your scores.
Mental Processing

BLOCKING OUTSIDE
INTERFERENCE

Block Distractions
Working memory depends on your ability to drown out distractions and take in key information for tasks.

WORKING MEMORY IN PRACTICE

Working memory applies to a number of areas of real life.

LEARNING

Working memory is key for moving information from short term memory into long term memory through rehearsing or repeating the information. In other words, working memory allows you to retain and learn new things, and is essential to learning. Working memory is key for taking good notes during a meeting or lecture.

EXECUTIVE
FUNCTIONING

It strongly impacts what we call executive functioning – that part of your brain that is responsible for making decisions, controlling impulses, and managing behaviors. You can think of executive functioning as the “adult” part of our brain that allows us to be successful, functioning, independent individuals.
Executive Function

LANGUAGE, MATH,
& SPATIAL

Language Math Spatial
Working memory is key for both language, math, and spatial skills. Working memory is what allows people to work through higher level math problems as well as computer programming or writing code.

DAILY LIFE

Working memory allows someone to recall a recipe and follow it step by step. It also allows us to follow and process a conversation so that we can respond with appropriate statements or questions. It also enables us to remember what we need to pick up from the store.
Daily Life

IMPROVING WORKING MEMORY

SLEEP

Sometimes getting enough sleep and exercise is all it takes to address small issues with working memory.
Sleep

AVOID MULTITASKING

Avoid Multitasking
Make sure to eliminate distractions from your work space, close your email, block notifications and silence your phone if you really want to give your working memory the best chance of performing.

MEDITATION

Improving your general attention and concentration skills through meditation will also help your working memory.
Meditation

CHUNKING
INFORMATION

Chunking
Chunking information, or combining individual pieces of information into a smaller number of groups, can help your working memory retain more. For example, dividing your mental shopping list into broader groups, like fruits, vegetables, and dairy products.

TAKING NOTES

Note taking as you work through a larger problem, listen to a webinar or meeting, or read a technical report is another great way to support your working memory as it helps you process information more actively. By the way, taking notes with a pen and paper is more effective than taking notes on a keyboard.
Taking Notes

ONLINE MEMORY
GAMES

Online Memory Games
A number of online games claim to improve working memory as well, but many of these have not been proven to do so. If you are interested in using an online game, do your research to find one with actual proven results.

PROFESSIONAL
THERAPY

Individuals with serious working memory and attention problems, so serious that they get in the way of school or work, may benefit from discussing their concerns with a psychiatrist for possible medication or therapy.
Professional Therapy
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YOUR PERSONALIZED
IQ ANALYSIS

Pattern Recognition

PATTERN
RECOGNITION

mepr_name
mepr_date
Strong
Good

STRONG

GOOD

HAD CHALLENGES IN

PATTERN
RECOGNITION
SKILLS

ANALYSIS

OF YOUR PATTERN RECOGNITION ABILITIES

Your score on pattern recognition indicates that you have strong nonverbal abstract reasoning skills.
Your score on pattern recognition indicates that you have a good ability to solve nonverbal abstract problems and don’t exhibit any particular challenges in solving these problems.
Your score on pattern recognition indicates that you may have had some challenges solving Nonverbal abstract problems on the test. You may have struggled with mentally organizing and manipulating what you were seeing on the test or had difficulty with attention or concentration during the test. Nonverbal abstract reasoning is composed of multiple skills. It could be that one of these skills was especially challenging for you today:
Analogies
ANALOGIES
Your ability to recognize and apply analogies to a problem is stronger than most. For example, you are able to recognize that if A is like B, and A is like C, B and C probably share qualities as well.
ANALOGIES
When faced with an abstract problem, you are able to recognize similarities between concepts and use those similarities to help problem solve.
ANALOGIES
When faced with an abstract problem, this is the ability to recognize similarities between concepts and use those similarities to help problem solve.
THEORIES
You are also very capable of identifying theories and rules about how objects relate to one another, and confident enough to test these ideas.
THEORIES
You are also capable of coming up with theories or rules about how abstract concepts are related, and are able to test out your ideas. For example, that means that you notice and determine that all round red objects must be followed by non-round blue objects.
THEORIES
This is the ability to make and test theories or rules about how objects relate to one another. For example, noticing and determining that all round red objects must be followed by non-round blue objects.
Theories
Attention to Detail
ATTENTION TO DETAIL
You have a strong ability to notice and attend to details and your visual surroundings.
ATTENTION TO DETAIL
You have the ability to pay attention to details and are able to notice and remember key parts of your visual surroundings.
ATTENTION TO DETAIL
The capacity to pay sufficient attention to details and notice and remember key parts of your visual surroundings.
UNDERSTANDING PART-WHOLE RELATIONSHIPS
You also have a strong understanding of part-whole relationships and are able to see the relationships between different abstract concepts, which is likely reflected in strong mathematical or other science-based skills.
UNDERSTANDING PART-WHOLE RELATIONSHIPS
You identify relationships between abstract parts and wholes, such as recognizing that a number is comprised of different sets of smaller numbers.
UNDERSTANDING PART-WHOLE RELATIONSHIPS
The ability to identify relationships between abstract parts and wholes. For example, recognizing that a number is comprised of different sets of smaller numbers.
Part-Whole Relationships
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PATTERN RECOGNITION OVERVIEW

Pattern Recognition involves your ability to solve problems that are abstract. Abstract problems are not physical and nonverbal. This means the problems are visual and not dependent on words or language. We refer to this as “Nonverbal abstract reasoning”.
Cubes

PATTERN RECOGNITION SKILLS

Pattern Recognition or Nonverbal abstract reasoning is made up of a number skills that come together to help you solve problems:

USE OF ANALOGIES

Seeing how two things are similar
Analogies

MAKING & TESTING
HYPOTHESES OR
THEORIES

Hypotheses and Theories

ATTENTION TO
DETAIL

Attention to Detail

UNDERSTANDING
PART-WHOLE
RELATIONSHIPS

Part-Whole Relationships
Understanding that a whole is comprised of parts and parts come together to create a whole (e.g., seeing that the number 16 is comprised of two eights, and also four fours).

PATTERN RECOGNITION IN PRACTICE

Pattern recognition, which assesses nonverbal abstract reasoning, applies to a number of areas of real life.

VISUALIZATION

Visualization
Nonverbal abstract reasoning allows people to move from a visual, two dimensional representation to 3D, such as creating blueprints, sketches, patterns, networks or other systems, and then implementing the designs in real life.

DAILY LIFE

Nonverbal abstract reasoning allows someone to look at instructions for assembling a new piece of furniture and then correctly assemble it.
Daily Life

PUZZLES, MATH,
& SCIENCE

Puzzles Math and Science
Working memory is key for both language, math, and spatial skills. Working memory is what allows people to work through higher level math problems as well as computer programming or writing code.

IMPROVING PATTERN RECOGNITION (NONVERBAL ABSTRACT REASONING)

COMPLEX PUZZLES

Puzzles, including jigsaw puzzles and building games, can help boost your nonverbal abstract reasoning.
Puzzles

CHESS

Chess
Playing chess is another fun way to strengthen your nonverbal abstract reasoning.

MATH

Putting your calculator away for awhile and doing more everyday math problems by hand.
Math

ATTENTION TO DETAIL

Attention to Detail
Finding ways to improve your attention to detail. There are many ways to do this – try eliminating distractions in your physical environment, avoid multitasking, and practice tuning in to the immediate moment through activities such as meditation.
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